Our Partners

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Since inception in 1944, the World Bank has expanded from a single institution to a closely associated group of five development institutions. Our mission evolved from the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) as facilitator of post-war reconstruction and development to the present-day mandate of worldwide poverty alleviation in close coordination with our affiliate, the International Development Association, and other members of the World Bank Group, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the Multilateral Guarantee Agency (MIGA), and the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID).

Once, we had a homogeneous staff of engineers and financial analysts, based solely in Washington, D.C. Today, we have a multidisciplinary and diverse staff that includes economists, public policy experts, sector experts and social scientists—and now more than a third of our staff is based in country offices.

Reconstruction remains an important part of our work. However, at today’s World Bank, poverty reduction through an inclusive and sustainable globalization remains the overarching goal of our work.

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The KfW, formerly KfW Bankengruppe (banking group), is a German government-owned development bank, based in Frankfurt. Its name originally comes from Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau, meaning Reconstruction Credit Institute. It was formed in 1948 after World War II as part of the Marshall Plan.

It is owned by the Federal Republic of Germany (80%) and the States of Germany (20%). It is led by a five-member Managing Board headed by Ulrich Schröder, which in turn reports to a 37-member Supervisory Board. The chair of the Supervisory Board changes annually between the German Federal Ministers of Finance and Economic Affairs; the chairman for 2014 is Sigmar Gabriel.

KfW banking group covers over 90% of its borrowing needs in the capital markets, mainly through bonds that are guaranteed by the federal government. This allows KfW to raise funds at advantageous conditions. Together with its exemption from corporate taxes due to its legal status as a public agency and unremunerated equity provided by its public shareholders, this allows KfW to provide loans for purposes prescribed by the KfW law at lower rates than commercial banks. KfW is not allowed to compete with commercial banks, but it facilitates their business in areas within its mandate. KfW banking group has three business units with distinct functions, as well as several subsidiaries. Lending by KfW group’s two main business units, accounting for more than 90% of total lending, is in Germany and – to a more limited extent – in other European countries. However, its largest subsidiary, KfW IPEX Bank GmbH, lends predominantly internationally. A smaller subsidiary, the German Investment Corporation (DEG), and one of the group’s smaller business units, KfW Development Bank, are exclusively active in the international arena, each within their particular business areas.

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The National Commission for Social Action since its inception has the desire in the realization of sustainable development for rural communities, through the implementation of community-based demand-driven projects in support of Government’s national development priorities.

To actualize these desires, NaCSA through support from Government of Sierra Leone and other international development partners has implemented a lot of community development projects in communities across the country to address the issues of infrastructural breakdown that came as a result of the ten-year civil war that ravaged the country. Most of these facilities constructed now requires to be rehabilitated or reconstructed because of their lifespan.

The traditional donor projects implemented by the Commission are restricted to specific districts, sections and communities based on the funds available while other deprived communities left unattended to.

The Community Driven Development Project (CDDP) is a community-based intervention, designed to respond to requests that come from communities through community structures to the Commission, that are related to construction, reconstruction and rehabilitation of community facilities. The project is built upon lessons learnt from past community development projects implemented by NaCSA across the country.

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The Islamic Development Bank is an international financial institution established in pursuance of the Declaration of Intent issued by the Conference of Finance Ministers of Muslim Countries held in Jeddah in Dhul Q’adah 1393H, corresponding to December 1973. The Inaugural Meeting of the Board of Governors took place in Rajab 1395H, corresponding to July 1975, and the Bank was formally opened on 15 Shawwal 1395H corresponding to 20 October 1975.

The purpose of the Bank is to foster the economic development and social progress of member countries and Muslim communities individually as well as jointly in accordance with the principles of Shari’ah i.e., Islamic Law.

The functions of the Bank are to participate in equity capital and grant loans for productive projects and enterprises besides providing financial assistance to member countries in other forms for economic and social development. The Bank is also required to establish and operate special funds for specific purposes including a fund for assistance to Muslim communities in non-member countries, in addition to setting up trust funds. The Bank is authorized to accept deposits and to mobilize financial resources through Shari’ah compatible modes. It is also charged with the responsibility of assisting in the promotion of foreign trade especially in capital goods, among member countries; providing technical assistance to member countries; and extending training facilities for personnel engaged in development activities in Muslim countries to conform to the Shari’ah.

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The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization established on 24 October 1945 to promote international co-operation. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was created following the Second World War to prevent another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The UN Headquarters is situated in Manhattan, New York City and enjoys extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, promoting human rights, fostering social and economic development, protecting the environment, and providing humanitarian aid in cases of famine, natural disaster, and armed conflict.